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Got Questions About PrEP? Get Answers with the New PrEPfacts.org

, by San Francisco AIDS Foundation

SFAF-2013_11x17poster_GAYWondering whether PrEP is right for you? Already using PrEP and have questions? Get the facts about this HIV prevention tool at the new PrEPfacts.org, expanded to include culturally competent information for more people who may benefit from PrEP.

“Already a useful online resource for gay and bisexual men, the next phase of the site includes content sections specifically for African-Americans and Spanish-speaking Latinos, both gay and straight, and heterosexual women”—some of the U.S. populations at highest risk for HIV infection, explains a press release announcing the newly relaunched website.

Community health agencies and real-world PrEP users, including BETA’s own “Promiscuous Gay Nerd” Jake Sobo, helped shape new content on the information-packed site.

Pre-exposure prophylaxis is a relatively new HIV prevention strategy in which HIV-negative people take a daily pill to reduce their risk for HIV infection. Analyses of data from the large iPrEx trial with gay and bisexual men and transgender women found that, for people who take all seven pills per week, the estimated level of protection is 99%.

SFAF-2013_11x17poster_WOMENLike condoms, PrEP works if you use it: “If you don’t take PrEP consistently it can’t protect you from HIV, but if you do take it regularly it can offer strong protection,” the new site emphasizes.

PrEPfacts.org anticipates key questions from diverse perspectives—the PrEP curious, the PrEP skeptical, those interested in starting PrEP, current PrEP users, and providers—and offers accurate, useable answers to help you make informed decisions about your own health.

Here are just a few examples, excerpted from the new site:

I’m nervous about talking to my doctor about PrEP. How should I bring it up?

Talking to your doctor about sex can often be a nerve-wracking experience. Relax. It’s their job to provide the best care possible to you as their patient. Tell them that you heard about a new HIV prevention option called pre-exposure prophylaxis and you’re interested in discussing it with them to figure out if it’s right for you. They will probably ask you why you think it’s a good option for you. Be honest with them. Tell them that you heard it is highly effective, and that you’re concerned you might be at risk for contracting HIV. You can refer them to this website, too.

I don’t have private health insurance and PrEP is too expensive. Can I get Truvada for PrEP at low cost or for free?

Yes! If you don’t have insurance, there are ways to get Truvada for PrEP at no or low cost.

My PrEP Experience has a wonderful resource monitoring insurance and Medicaid coverage of Truvada for PrEP.  If you have trouble getting a prescription for Truvada as PrEP, or getting a PrEP prescription covered by insurance or Medicaid, please send an email to myprepexperience@gmail.com.

Why would someone who doesn’t have HIV decide to take a pill every day?

Taking a pill every day to prevent something from happening to your body is not a new or foreign concept. Currently, there are over 10 million women in the United States who take a pill every day to prevent pregnancy. Think of PrEP as like the birth control pill, except instead of preventing pregnancy, it reduces risk for HIV.

To get started putting this new resource to work for you, visit PrEPfacts.org.

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